The Catholic Worker Movement    |    Dorothy Day

The Catholic Worker Movement began simply enough on May 1, 1933, when a journalist named Dorothy Day and a philosopher named Peter Maurin teamed up to publish and distribute a newspaper called "The Catholic Worker." This radical paper promoted the biblical promise of justice and mercy.

Grounded in a firm belief in the God-given dignity of every human person, their movement was a committed to nonviolence, voluntary poverty, and the Works of Mercy as a way of life. It wasn't long before Dorothy and Peter were putting their beliefs into action, opening a "house of hospitality" where the homeless, the hungry, and the forsaken would always be welcome.

Over many decades the movement has protested injustice, war, and violence of all forms. Today there are some 185 Catholic Worker communities in the United States. Some people from the New York Catholic Worker started the Aamon Hennacy Worker in Saint Louis, Missouri, and some people from there helped Dan and Chris Delaney start the LACW over 30 years ago. About thirteen years after that, Jonathan and Rio Parfrey took $20,000 and their four kids, came to Santa Ana and opened Isaiah House.

Isaiah House of the Orange County Catholic Worker has served poor people with dignity since 1987. Located in Santa Ana's eastside barrio on Cypress Street, this house of hospitality is open to people in need. Respectful personal attention is at the heart of our service.

Isaiah House offers formal meals for the homeless, shelter, bags of food and clothing, showers, emergency assistance, a relaxing backyard, and always a friendly ear and kind words of support.